Posted in advertising, Blogs, Branding, Entrepreneur, Events, Holiday, Keynote Speaker, Marketing, Podcast, Promotional Products, Sales, small business, Trade Shows, Uncategorized

Creating Multi Sensory Brand Experiences

Let’s say you are looking for a hotel online and while clicking around you see an enticing web banner for the Westin hotel.  You click through and after scrolling through amenities and pictures, you book your stay.  Months later, when you arrive there is a welcome kit that includes a Westin branded lavender essential oils kit and a card that invites you to sit back, relax, and enjoy your stay.  After a long flight, a luxurious soak is just what you need, so you draw a warm bath, close your eyes and let the lavender scent lull you into a state of relaxation.

Westin

This is what you call sensory marketing, and promotional products are the only form of advertising that can engage all of the senses at once.  So it may have been an ad placement online that first got your attention, but long after your stay it is the smell and memory of the relaxing lavender bath that is going to be what really solidifies your opinion of Westin as a brand. In the digital age, traditional advertising isn’t working on its own. More and more companies are employing stimuli such as scent, sound, touch, taste, and hearing to build stronger emotional connections with the customer and drive preference for their brands.  For a very minimal cost, you are immersing your customer in a multi-sensory and memorable experience that has the potential to forge some serious brand loyalty.

So, how important is sensory branding, and does it really work?

According to the 2005 book “Brand Sense” by branding expert Martin Lindstrom, 83% of current advertising appeals to the eyes only.  Visual advertisements (think billboards, print ads, web banners) are being processed in the cortex of the brain, which is responsible for a person’s thoughts and actions.  Smell and taste, however, are linked to the limbic system which is responsible for forming memories and emotions.  If a brand can integrate smell and taste into their advertising efforts, they are going to make an unforgettable impression and can even influence a customer’s purchasing habits.

The science behind sensory marketing is solid and increasingly more and more marketing firms are including the discipline in their media offerings.  As for its effectiveness, Nike increased purchase intent by 80% just by adding scents to their stores, and gas stations that emitted the smell of coffee near their pumps saw coffee sales increased by almost 300 percent!  Appealing to the senses is proven to be effective, and branded merchandise is the most cost efficient way to do so.

5 senses

I am incredibly passionate about promotional products and truly believe in their effectiveness to spread what we like to call those “Brand Love” moments.  At the same time, it is not my intention to cannibalize other forms of advertising and instead want to encourage you to add branded merchandise to your media mix to add value and increase ROI on advertising spend that is already in place.

With traditional advertising, you are acquiring impressions as long as your advertisement is running. When your contract ends, so does your reach.  With promotional products, you continue making impressions and spreading Brand Love long after your campaign has ended.  For example, a single backpack can generate 5k+ impressions in its lifetime, essentially making it a walking billboard for your brand. A bag is also something you can see and touch and can become a part of your customer’s everyday life. You can extend the life of your advertising campaign by adding branded merch that appeals to all of the senses to the mix.

So, what can your company do today?

I encourage you to take a hard look at your marketing plan and assess your current use of sensory branded products.  Could you promote an upcoming new flavor of ice cream by giving out a custom flavored and scented lip balm?  Or maybe you really want to push a new jingle with liquid soap that plays your song every time you dispense it?  Brands that appeal to multiple senses will be more successful than brands that only focus on one or two.  At Boundless, we specialize in creative branding and can assist you in identifying which branded products will best suit an overall sensory branding initiative. Let’s face it, to be memorable in the digital age you have to stand out and immerse your customers in an experience and a feeling.  Let’s create a sensory journey your consumers can go on with your products and services!

Advertisements
Posted in advertising, Blogs, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Promotional Products, small business, Trade Shows

Tipping the Scale – How Promotional Products Compete in a New Era of Advertising (*Reference: PPAI.Org)

How Promotional Products Compete in a New Era of Advertising 

Promotional products US Impressions

Excerpts from the article:

Earlier this year, PaigeFair reported that mobile ad-blocking software has grown to an estimated 380 million users and 236 million active desktop devices, indicating “interruption” as the leading reason for consumer use. PaigeFair also reported a staggering 74 percent of consumers will abandon websites that require them to disable their ad-blocker software...Promotional products not only allow brand messages to effectively reach their intended audience, they also spread the
word to anyone who sees the product displayed, used or shared. Promotional
products are used daily, and 83 percent of consumers use them more than once brands to engage with consumers without forcing unsolicited advertising. The race to win the consumer path to purchase is contingent on consumers being able to actually remember the brand at the point of purchase. If they can’t recall a brand, they are less likely to
buy the brand. 

Moumita Das, author, is
research coordinator at PPAI.

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Millenials, Trade Shows

Smart Phones are sticky for Promotional Products

Our increasing attachment to our smartphones has caused a market for sticky wallets that stick onto the back of phones or phone cases to hold credit cards and cash. Since these wallets are inexpensive, it makes it easy for companies to offer these card sleeves as promotional products. Now every time someone pulls out their phone or goes to pay for something, they and the people around them are seeing your logo and design, as well as making the connection between utility and your brand.

sticky_holder

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Millenials, Promotional Products, small business

SXSW Explores Promotional Products

Source: PPAI Publications

Now in its 20th year, Austin, Texas-based South by Southwest (SXSW) has grown from a regional music festival to a 10-day conglomeration of festivals and conferences tackling film, music, advertising and marketing, interactive media and more. Currently in the middle of its March 10-17 run, the SXSW 2017’s Brands & Marketing track, part of SXSW Interactive, explores native advertising, brand storytelling and other topics relevant to promotional products industry practitioners.

SXSW offers attendees dozens of sessions to mix and match a program that suits their needs. Here are a sampling for promotional products professionals wanting to explore the cutting edge:

“Can I Order a Drink Via My T-shirt Yet?” explores digital connectivity and the data and information it can generate about consumers, how this trend will affect buying habits and routines, and what consumers will expect from the brands they engage with.

Automated assistants—software that can perform tasks or services based on user input, location awareness and online access—have the potential to completely change how consumers interact with brands, and the session “The Automated Assistant Revolution” looks at the latest developments in the technology and how its brands can apply it to their salesforce.

In “Bespoke, the New Mass Production. A Fender Hit,” panelists delve into the intersection of new production technology and consumers’ demand for individualized products, and how companies can implement large-scale manufacturing of customized products. Highlighted in the session is the story of guitar maker Fender, where customization has helped it grow its brand and profits.

Imagery can define a brand. The panelists participating in “Contemporary Curation: How Imagery Shapes a Brand” highlighted that a brand’s story, which creates a personal relationship between a business and its customers, is told in part through imagery, and how a brand’s visual identity can strengthen or confuse its story.

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, small business, Uncategorized

Power of Innovation: Drive change and create new revenue opportunities

 

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” Charles Darwin

The Power Of InnovationInnovation plays a key role in business. It drives change, and change can lead to new revenue opportunities for your business. Innovation can produce sudden and dramatic changes to the way business is done and the way consumers experience the products and services made by companies.

Innovation, as described by innovation expert Jake Nielsen:

A lot of managers think of new markets in terms of geography, such as entering an emerging market like India or China. While that can be highly valuable, new market innovations can also refer to use cases, such as applying a current product in a new way and sometimes even for a different segment of customers. The classic example often cited is Arm & Hammer baking soda. The primary use for baking soda is as a leavening agent for dough when baking bread. However, after baking soda had been in the market for a while, Arm & Hammer discovered a trend among its customers—using baking soda as a deodorizer. People were putting an open container of baking soda in their refrigerator (baking soda does not need to be refrigerated) simply to neutralize any odors from foods. This prompted the company to start marketing baking soda as a multi-purpose product rather than for use only in baking.

There are several things to consider when exploring new markets for your product including:

Adjacent spaces: What industries or uses would you consider as adjacent? Often adjacent spaces are fertile ground for introduction of your existing product(s) or service(s).

Other jobs to be done: Like in the Arm & Hammer example, baking soda was capable of performing multiple jobs for the customer quite well, even though at the beginning Arm & Hammer was only thinking of the job of baking. What other jobs does your product do? Could those be marketed to other customers?

Customer usage studies: For some products, customers may already be using your product in new and different ways that you haven’t considered yet. Market-research methods are best suited to bring those use cases to light.

New market innovations can be extraordinarily successful if executed well. In some cases, all it takes to introduce a product into a new market is educating your customers, both current and new, about the other things your product can do. This can either be a cost-leadership or benefit-leadership strategy. If you have a product that is basically a premium-value product (benefit leadership) in its existing form and you manage to successfully apply that product to a new use case then the value of your product will need to be weighed in light of the alternatives for the new use case. For example, if Arm & Hammer baking soda costs $4 a box while most other baking soda brands cost around $2 a box, then it’s safe to assume that the Arm & Hammer baking soda is viewed as a benefit-leader product.

However, if most refrigerator deodorizers cost an average of $8 a bottle, then the Arm & Hammer baking soda is essentially a cost leader against the alternative deodorizers. This scenario is often what can make some products so successful when applied in a new way.

Ready to learn about one more strategy for innovation? Read PCT tomorrow and get tips on being disruptive.

Source: Jake Nielsen is the founder of TheInnovativeManager.com, which includes the tools and trade secrets great innovators, entrepreneurs and thought leaders have used throughout history to change the world. He is also a contributor to Innovation Excellence, an online home of the global innovation community, building upon a rapidly growing network with thousands of members from over 175 countries.

Compiled by Cassandra Johnson

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Millenials, Promotional Products, small business, Speaker, Trade Shows

Create Your Space

create-space-bookI have to share with you a book (a resource) titled Create Your Space by Said Baaghil – you’ll learn how, as a business owner, to create your own space and most importantly understand how the dynamics of brand and marketing are changing and evolving…break through to the other side of conventional marketing and disrupt your competition. Said provided me an early excerpt of his book and I was fortunate to have my review included in his book. http://tinyurl.com/za7vfw6

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Gen Y, Marketing, Millenials, Podcast, Uncategorized

PromoKitchen Podcast #108 | Daniel Bielak – Are We Ready for Gen Z? November 30, 2016 By Mark Graham

A conversation with Daniel Bielek: Many people in our industry worry and complain about the younger generation, most commonly known as millennials or Gen Y. Whether their concerns are based on reality or fiction, suffice it to say that much ink has been spilled on why our industry needs to sit up and pay attention to younger buyers and employees.

http://www.promokitchen.org/blog/promokitchen-podcast-108-daniel-bielak bill-korowitz-podcast-graphic

Posted in Entrepreneur, small business

Servant Leadership – Building a Better You

When we think of leaders—especially corporate leaders—we often conjure up images of a corner office with mahogany furniture. We envision an executive with a team that is serving him or her, not the leader serving the team.

However, in 1970, Robert K. Greenleaf coined the term “servant as leader” referring to a leader who serves first. As Greenleaf describes, “It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve, to serve first… That person is sharply different from one who is a leader first, perhaps because of the need to assuage an unusual power drive or to acquire material possessions …”

Promotional Consultant Today shares the 10 characteristics of servant leaders, as identified by Greenleaf.

  1. Listening
  2. Empath
  3. Healing
  4. Awareness
  5. Persuasion
  6. Conceptualization
  7. Foresight
  8. Stewardship
  9. Commitment to the growth of people
  10. Building community

You are a servant leader when you focus on the needs of others before you consider your own. It’s a longer-term approach to leadership, rather than a technique that you can adopt in specific situations.

Servant leaders are likely to have more engaged employees and enjoy better relationships with team members and other stakeholders than leaders who don’t put the interests of others before their own.

As you lead a team, a project or an entire department or company, beginning practicing the characteristics and enjoy the benefits of serving others.

Share this content with your clients (without the ad) by clicking the ClientSafe button below.

Source: Established in 1996, Mind Tools is a website that helps more than 25,000,000 people each year. These individuals come from many different levels within organizations ranging from senior executives and business owners to young professionals and career-starters. Mind Tools provides hundreds of useful career skills for free on the website as well as new management and career techniques every week through a free newsletter.