Posted in advertising, Blogs, Branding, Entrepreneur, Events, Holiday, Keynote Speaker, Marketing, Podcast, Promotional Products, Sales, small business, Trade Shows, Uncategorized

Creating Multi Sensory Brand Experiences

Let’s say you are looking for a hotel online and while clicking around you see an enticing web banner for the Westin hotel.  You click through and after scrolling through amenities and pictures, you book your stay.  Months later, when you arrive there is a welcome kit that includes a Westin branded lavender essential oils kit and a card that invites you to sit back, relax, and enjoy your stay.  After a long flight, a luxurious soak is just what you need, so you draw a warm bath, close your eyes and let the lavender scent lull you into a state of relaxation.

Westin

This is what you call sensory marketing, and promotional products are the only form of advertising that can engage all of the senses at once.  So it may have been an ad placement online that first got your attention, but long after your stay it is the smell and memory of the relaxing lavender bath that is going to be what really solidifies your opinion of Westin as a brand. In the digital age, traditional advertising isn’t working on its own. More and more companies are employing stimuli such as scent, sound, touch, taste, and hearing to build stronger emotional connections with the customer and drive preference for their brands.  For a very minimal cost, you are immersing your customer in a multi-sensory and memorable experience that has the potential to forge some serious brand loyalty.

So, how important is sensory branding, and does it really work?

According to the 2005 book “Brand Sense” by branding expert Martin Lindstrom, 83% of current advertising appeals to the eyes only.  Visual advertisements (think billboards, print ads, web banners) are being processed in the cortex of the brain, which is responsible for a person’s thoughts and actions.  Smell and taste, however, are linked to the limbic system which is responsible for forming memories and emotions.  If a brand can integrate smell and taste into their advertising efforts, they are going to make an unforgettable impression and can even influence a customer’s purchasing habits.

The science behind sensory marketing is solid and increasingly more and more marketing firms are including the discipline in their media offerings.  As for its effectiveness, Nike increased purchase intent by 80% just by adding scents to their stores, and gas stations that emitted the smell of coffee near their pumps saw coffee sales increased by almost 300 percent!  Appealing to the senses is proven to be effective, and branded merchandise is the most cost efficient way to do so.

5 senses

I am incredibly passionate about promotional products and truly believe in their effectiveness to spread what we like to call those “Brand Love” moments.  At the same time, it is not my intention to cannibalize other forms of advertising and instead want to encourage you to add branded merchandise to your media mix to add value and increase ROI on advertising spend that is already in place.

With traditional advertising, you are acquiring impressions as long as your advertisement is running. When your contract ends, so does your reach.  With promotional products, you continue making impressions and spreading Brand Love long after your campaign has ended.  For example, a single backpack can generate 5k+ impressions in its lifetime, essentially making it a walking billboard for your brand. A bag is also something you can see and touch and can become a part of your customer’s everyday life. You can extend the life of your advertising campaign by adding branded merch that appeals to all of the senses to the mix.

So, what can your company do today?

I encourage you to take a hard look at your marketing plan and assess your current use of sensory branded products.  Could you promote an upcoming new flavor of ice cream by giving out a custom flavored and scented lip balm?  Or maybe you really want to push a new jingle with liquid soap that plays your song every time you dispense it?  Brands that appeal to multiple senses will be more successful than brands that only focus on one or two.  At Boundless, we specialize in creative branding and can assist you in identifying which branded products will best suit an overall sensory branding initiative. Let’s face it, to be memorable in the digital age you have to stand out and immerse your customers in an experience and a feeling.  Let’s create a sensory journey your consumers can go on with your products and services!

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Posted in advertising, Blogs, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Promotional Products, small business, Trade Shows

Tipping the Scale – How Promotional Products Compete in a New Era of Advertising (*Reference: PPAI.Org)

How Promotional Products Compete in a New Era of Advertising 

Promotional products US Impressions

Excerpts from the article:

Earlier this year, PaigeFair reported that mobile ad-blocking software has grown to an estimated 380 million users and 236 million active desktop devices, indicating “interruption” as the leading reason for consumer use. PaigeFair also reported a staggering 74 percent of consumers will abandon websites that require them to disable their ad-blocker software...Promotional products not only allow brand messages to effectively reach their intended audience, they also spread the
word to anyone who sees the product displayed, used or shared. Promotional
products are used daily, and 83 percent of consumers use them more than once brands to engage with consumers without forcing unsolicited advertising. The race to win the consumer path to purchase is contingent on consumers being able to actually remember the brand at the point of purchase. If they can’t recall a brand, they are less likely to
buy the brand. 

Moumita Das, author, is
research coordinator at PPAI.

Posted in advertising, Branding, Events, Marketing, Promotional Products, Trade Shows

Enlighten the Attendee’s Senses

The longer a promotional product is kept, the more impressions it makes on the recipient and anyone else who is exposed to the recipient using the product. The majority of consumers keep a promotional product between one and five years. Women may keep a promotional product up to 10 years, whereas men may keep a promotional product for 11 or more years. I know that I’ll be hanging on to my personalized branded items from https://lnkd.in/ePsGP4f #brandlove #sensorybranding

 

LopezNegrete promo

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Millenials, Promotional Products, small business

SXSW Explores Promotional Products

Source: PPAI Publications

Now in its 20th year, Austin, Texas-based South by Southwest (SXSW) has grown from a regional music festival to a 10-day conglomeration of festivals and conferences tackling film, music, advertising and marketing, interactive media and more. Currently in the middle of its March 10-17 run, the SXSW 2017’s Brands & Marketing track, part of SXSW Interactive, explores native advertising, brand storytelling and other topics relevant to promotional products industry practitioners.

SXSW offers attendees dozens of sessions to mix and match a program that suits their needs. Here are a sampling for promotional products professionals wanting to explore the cutting edge:

“Can I Order a Drink Via My T-shirt Yet?” explores digital connectivity and the data and information it can generate about consumers, how this trend will affect buying habits and routines, and what consumers will expect from the brands they engage with.

Automated assistants—software that can perform tasks or services based on user input, location awareness and online access—have the potential to completely change how consumers interact with brands, and the session “The Automated Assistant Revolution” looks at the latest developments in the technology and how its brands can apply it to their salesforce.

In “Bespoke, the New Mass Production. A Fender Hit,” panelists delve into the intersection of new production technology and consumers’ demand for individualized products, and how companies can implement large-scale manufacturing of customized products. Highlighted in the session is the story of guitar maker Fender, where customization has helped it grow its brand and profits.

Imagery can define a brand. The panelists participating in “Contemporary Curation: How Imagery Shapes a Brand” highlighted that a brand’s story, which creates a personal relationship between a business and its customers, is told in part through imagery, and how a brand’s visual identity can strengthen or confuse its story.

Posted in Branding, Events, Promotional Products, Trade Shows

2017 Tradeshow Survival Guide

Happy Friday,

I had the opportunity of contributing a few best practices regarding trade-shows – knowing that we’re entering the trade show season right now and figuring out how to prepare, which exhibitors to see and who to set up appointments with so we get the most from our investment and the show – this article will be a helpful resource to you throughout the 2017 trade show season.

So, sit back where ever you are and absorb the terrific ideas in this article 

If you’d like to connect with me directly about any of the information shared in this article, please email me and I’ll respond and schedule some time with you.

The image is showing you how the @mandalaybay uses their #brandedmerchandise – items sourced at a recent trade show and then presented to the #hotel for them to create a memorable experience for their guests!

Have a restful weekend and a prosperous trade show season!

Chriswpid-wp-1421079733894.jpeg

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Millenials, Promotional Products, small business, Speaker, Trade Shows

Create Your Space

create-space-bookI have to share with you a book (a resource) titled Create Your Space by Said Baaghil – you’ll learn how, as a business owner, to create your own space and most importantly understand how the dynamics of brand and marketing are changing and evolving…break through to the other side of conventional marketing and disrupt your competition. Said provided me an early excerpt of his book and I was fortunate to have my review included in his book. http://tinyurl.com/za7vfw6

Posted in advertising, Blogs, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Promotional Products, Uncategorized

6 Personalities in the Workplace

Author Bio

Range of Personalities

As a marketer, it is my job to deliver the right message to the right person, at the right time.  While that seems simple enough, in reality there are many factors that go into communicating with your audience and representing your brand.  The tone has to be equal parts informative and entertaining, and the content should be catered to what your audience wants to read.  That last part is key.  And understanding who your audience is, and what motivates them is arguably the most important factor in making a connection (AKA, building Brand Love!).

So let’s talk about personality and why it matters.  Think of your brand, your logo, and how you project your brand to your audience.  If you were to assign your brand a persona, what would it be?  If Crate & Barrel were personified, some of their personality traits would be organized, inviting and friendly.  If REI was a living, breathing person surely they would be adventurous, down-to-earth and outdoorsy.  Your messaging should reflect the personality traits that your brand represents in order to be effective.

Now, think of your target audience.  Who are they? Are they easy-going, or a perfectionist?  Do they like to take charge, or work behind the scenes?  Everyone is different and some products and brands will appeal to your audience more than others will.  Although every single person in your audience is unique, for this exercise, think broadly about their profile.  According to psychologist John Holland, there are 6 major personalities in the workplace and each one is unique and is motivated by different factors.

Realistic PersonalityRealistic

These are the doers!  They are independent, stable, active, persistent, practical, and thrifty.  They prefer to work with things rather than ideas and people.  They are no-nonsense and down-to-earth people and are often the ones that keep the team level-headed in a crisis.  They prefer being outdoors and like to “learn by doing” as opposed to learning in a classroom setting.

An example of a brand that appeals to a Realistic audience is:REI

InvestigativeInvestigative

These are the thinkers!  They are introspective, inquisitive, analytical, and intellectual.  They prefer tasks that involve using logic to solve highly complex, abstract problems.  In the workplace they are often the one that insists on doing their research and having hard data to support a plan of action.

An example of a brand that appeals to an Investigative audience is: IBM

 

Artistic

Artistic

These are the creators!  They are intuitive, creative, expressive, original, and innovative.  They place an emphasis on feelings, imagination, and are spontaneous and open-minded.  In the workplace they are often the ones coming up with creative solutions and ideas.

An example of a brand that appeals to an Artistic audience is:Apple

 

Social

Social

This type of audience is helpful!  They are friendly, generous, idealistic, responsible, helpful, empathetic and tactful.  In their workplace they are always willing to step up to any challenge asked of them.  They care a lot about workplace relationships and enjoy working in group settings.

An example of a brand that appeals to a Social audience is:TOMS

 

EnterprisingEnterprising

These types of people are persuaders!  They are adventurous, ambitious, self-confident, enthusiastic, and motivational.  In the workplace they are a natural leader and their co-workers look to them for direction.  They prefer work that involves public speaking, taking risks, debating, and competing.  They are good at seeing the big picture and are highly motivated by promotions.

An example of a brand that appeals to an Enterprising audience is: Tesla Motors

Conventional

Conventional

People with this personality type are organizers!  They are conscientious, conservative, logical, efficient, organized, and detail-oriented.  They value precision and accuracy in the work they do. In the office they are the one keeping everyone organized and on schedule.  They excel in practical tasks, quantitative measurements, and structured environments.  They like clearly defined rules and expectations.

An example of a brand that appeals to a Conventional audience is: Crate & Barrel

Is there a certain personality that you felt aligned with your brand?  Often times, people are a combination of these types and are susceptible to a broader message.  By learning more about personalities and brand personas you will be able to reach and communicate better with your audience and open doors to new opportunities.  This exercise is not only useful in learning more on your target audience, it is also a great way to improve synergy and team dynamics within your own office!

Curious about which one fits YOUR personality?  Take the quiz to find out.