Posted in advertising, Blogs, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Promotional Products, small business, Trade Shows

Tipping the Scale – How Promotional Products Compete in a New Era of Advertising (*Reference: PPAI.Org)

How Promotional Products Compete in a New Era of Advertising 

Promotional products US Impressions

Excerpts from the article:

Earlier this year, PaigeFair reported that mobile ad-blocking software has grown to an estimated 380 million users and 236 million active desktop devices, indicating “interruption” as the leading reason for consumer use. PaigeFair also reported a staggering 74 percent of consumers will abandon websites that require them to disable their ad-blocker software...Promotional products not only allow brand messages to effectively reach their intended audience, they also spread the
word to anyone who sees the product displayed, used or shared. Promotional
products are used daily, and 83 percent of consumers use them more than once brands to engage with consumers without forcing unsolicited advertising. The race to win the consumer path to purchase is contingent on consumers being able to actually remember the brand at the point of purchase. If they can’t recall a brand, they are less likely to
buy the brand. 

Moumita Das, author, is
research coordinator at PPAI.

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Millenials, Promotional Products, small business

SXSW Explores Promotional Products

Source: PPAI Publications

Now in its 20th year, Austin, Texas-based South by Southwest (SXSW) has grown from a regional music festival to a 10-day conglomeration of festivals and conferences tackling film, music, advertising and marketing, interactive media and more. Currently in the middle of its March 10-17 run, the SXSW 2017’s Brands & Marketing track, part of SXSW Interactive, explores native advertising, brand storytelling and other topics relevant to promotional products industry practitioners.

SXSW offers attendees dozens of sessions to mix and match a program that suits their needs. Here are a sampling for promotional products professionals wanting to explore the cutting edge:

“Can I Order a Drink Via My T-shirt Yet?” explores digital connectivity and the data and information it can generate about consumers, how this trend will affect buying habits and routines, and what consumers will expect from the brands they engage with.

Automated assistants—software that can perform tasks or services based on user input, location awareness and online access—have the potential to completely change how consumers interact with brands, and the session “The Automated Assistant Revolution” looks at the latest developments in the technology and how its brands can apply it to their salesforce.

In “Bespoke, the New Mass Production. A Fender Hit,” panelists delve into the intersection of new production technology and consumers’ demand for individualized products, and how companies can implement large-scale manufacturing of customized products. Highlighted in the session is the story of guitar maker Fender, where customization has helped it grow its brand and profits.

Imagery can define a brand. The panelists participating in “Contemporary Curation: How Imagery Shapes a Brand” highlighted that a brand’s story, which creates a personal relationship between a business and its customers, is told in part through imagery, and how a brand’s visual identity can strengthen or confuse its story.

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, small business, Uncategorized

Power of Innovation: Drive change and create new revenue opportunities

 

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” Charles Darwin

The Power Of InnovationInnovation plays a key role in business. It drives change, and change can lead to new revenue opportunities for your business. Innovation can produce sudden and dramatic changes to the way business is done and the way consumers experience the products and services made by companies.

Innovation, as described by innovation expert Jake Nielsen:

A lot of managers think of new markets in terms of geography, such as entering an emerging market like India or China. While that can be highly valuable, new market innovations can also refer to use cases, such as applying a current product in a new way and sometimes even for a different segment of customers. The classic example often cited is Arm & Hammer baking soda. The primary use for baking soda is as a leavening agent for dough when baking bread. However, after baking soda had been in the market for a while, Arm & Hammer discovered a trend among its customers—using baking soda as a deodorizer. People were putting an open container of baking soda in their refrigerator (baking soda does not need to be refrigerated) simply to neutralize any odors from foods. This prompted the company to start marketing baking soda as a multi-purpose product rather than for use only in baking.

There are several things to consider when exploring new markets for your product including:

Adjacent spaces: What industries or uses would you consider as adjacent? Often adjacent spaces are fertile ground for introduction of your existing product(s) or service(s).

Other jobs to be done: Like in the Arm & Hammer example, baking soda was capable of performing multiple jobs for the customer quite well, even though at the beginning Arm & Hammer was only thinking of the job of baking. What other jobs does your product do? Could those be marketed to other customers?

Customer usage studies: For some products, customers may already be using your product in new and different ways that you haven’t considered yet. Market-research methods are best suited to bring those use cases to light.

New market innovations can be extraordinarily successful if executed well. In some cases, all it takes to introduce a product into a new market is educating your customers, both current and new, about the other things your product can do. This can either be a cost-leadership or benefit-leadership strategy. If you have a product that is basically a premium-value product (benefit leadership) in its existing form and you manage to successfully apply that product to a new use case then the value of your product will need to be weighed in light of the alternatives for the new use case. For example, if Arm & Hammer baking soda costs $4 a box while most other baking soda brands cost around $2 a box, then it’s safe to assume that the Arm & Hammer baking soda is viewed as a benefit-leader product.

However, if most refrigerator deodorizers cost an average of $8 a bottle, then the Arm & Hammer baking soda is essentially a cost leader against the alternative deodorizers. This scenario is often what can make some products so successful when applied in a new way.

Ready to learn about one more strategy for innovation? Read PCT tomorrow and get tips on being disruptive.

Source: Jake Nielsen is the founder of TheInnovativeManager.com, which includes the tools and trade secrets great innovators, entrepreneurs and thought leaders have used throughout history to change the world. He is also a contributor to Innovation Excellence, an online home of the global innovation community, building upon a rapidly growing network with thousands of members from over 175 countries.

Compiled by Cassandra Johnson

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Millenials, Promotional Products, small business, Speaker, Trade Shows

Create Your Space

create-space-bookI have to share with you a book (a resource) titled Create Your Space by Said Baaghil – you’ll learn how, as a business owner, to create your own space and most importantly understand how the dynamics of brand and marketing are changing and evolving…break through to the other side of conventional marketing and disrupt your competition. Said provided me an early excerpt of his book and I was fortunate to have my review included in his book. http://tinyurl.com/za7vfw6

Posted in Entrepreneur, small business

Servant Leadership – Building a Better You

When we think of leaders—especially corporate leaders—we often conjure up images of a corner office with mahogany furniture. We envision an executive with a team that is serving him or her, not the leader serving the team.

However, in 1970, Robert K. Greenleaf coined the term “servant as leader” referring to a leader who serves first. As Greenleaf describes, “It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve, to serve first… That person is sharply different from one who is a leader first, perhaps because of the need to assuage an unusual power drive or to acquire material possessions …”

Promotional Consultant Today shares the 10 characteristics of servant leaders, as identified by Greenleaf.

  1. Listening
  2. Empath
  3. Healing
  4. Awareness
  5. Persuasion
  6. Conceptualization
  7. Foresight
  8. Stewardship
  9. Commitment to the growth of people
  10. Building community

You are a servant leader when you focus on the needs of others before you consider your own. It’s a longer-term approach to leadership, rather than a technique that you can adopt in specific situations.

Servant leaders are likely to have more engaged employees and enjoy better relationships with team members and other stakeholders than leaders who don’t put the interests of others before their own.

As you lead a team, a project or an entire department or company, beginning practicing the characteristics and enjoy the benefits of serving others.

Share this content with your clients (without the ad) by clicking the ClientSafe button below.

Source: Established in 1996, Mind Tools is a website that helps more than 25,000,000 people each year. These individuals come from many different levels within organizations ranging from senior executives and business owners to young professionals and career-starters. Mind Tools provides hundreds of useful career skills for free on the website as well as new management and career techniques every week through a free newsletter.

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Events, Marketing, Podcast, Promotional Products, Real Estate, Sales, small business, Trade Shows

Promotional Products’ Impact on Brand/Company Image

Promotional Products are effective in reaching and influencing people – An experiment conducted by Georgia Southern University show that recipients of promotional products have a significantly more positive image of a company than consumers who do not receive promotional products.

Promotional products can be used alone or integrated with other media, there are virtually limitless ways to use them. Popular programs cited most often by promotional consultants are business gifts, employee relations, orientation programs, corporate communications, and at tradeshows to generate booth traffic.

Tradeshows for example – including a promotional product with a pre-show mailing or an offer of a promotional product increases the likelihood of an attendee stopping by a tradeshow booth.

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Events, Marketing, Promotional Products, Sales, Senses Sensory branding, small business

Compliment your Marketing Communications plan with 5 Senses

Did you know?

  • Promotional Products are the only form of advertising that your customer can see, touch, hear, taste and smell
  • Promotional Products are among the only forms of advertising that allow an audience to interact with your brand on a physical level and emotional level
  • Adding a promotional product to the media mix (print and television) increased brand interest (69 percent) and a good impression of the brand (84 percent).*
  • Integrating a promotional product with television and print also increased referral value by 52 percent and message credibility by 60 percent.*

Promotional Products are a Sensory Medium: Adding your message to a tangible product turns an ordinary message into a marketing experience your audience can smell, taste,see, hear, and touch.

adgi-senses-photo

Posted in advertising, Branding, Entrepreneur, Events, Marketing, Podcast, Sales, small business

Keep on and SWAG on! – Dan Pigott Podcast from PromoKitchen

Today, i’d like to introduce PromoKitchen – 

PromoKitchen is an all-volunteer, 501c3 non-profit organization led by professionals in the $20 billion dollar promotional products industry.  Our story began in January 2011: a group of young promotional products professionals banded together to create a new voice for the industry. PK (as industry reps like to call it – so now, you’re in the know) represents a cross section of the industry: suppliers, distributors and service providers, Americans and Canadians, men and women, salespeople and business owners, young and the young at heart. They believe that best practice sharing is a good thing for an industry that is going through rapid change. We also believe in the power of community and how this industry can improve by establishing stronger connections between us all.

Here’s a podcast of my friend and industry peer Dan Pigott who shares with us the vantage point of the multi-line rep. Multi-lines have helped establish the sales foundation for this industry – The Promotional Products Industry!

Listen, Learn, and Elevate your knowledge. When done please let me know what you think and I’ll be glad to pass along your comments to the PK Chefs.

Dan Pigott – Promotional Products Multi Line Rep Podcast

Posted in advertising, Bags, Branding, Entrepreneur, Events, Marketing, Promotional Products, Sales, small business, Trade Shows

Where do you want to say it?

So by now, you know I work in the promotional products industry and our clients look to us to find the most effective way to increase their brand’s loyalty with their current and prospective clients as well as help build their employees loyalty to their brand via providing them company branded products.

We like to ask our clients, if you had complete control of your brand where would you say it? I am lucky because most of the clients I’ve worked with have very colorful logos so why wouldn’t you want them on products that are used on a daily basis? I ask this because there is evidence that suggests a strong relationship between my client’s logo’s color and how it’s emotionally perceived.

So, whatever your logo’s feeling you’ll be able to say it bold or calm with the most advanced imprinting method the promotional products industry provides via your preferred promotional products consultant and be able to choose the right products. Doing this will insure a good return on your investment but most importantly increase your brand’s visibility and attract new clients and retain your current clients.

If you were to start out using promotional products to communicate your brand and support the other advertising mediums your company uses to market with; I’d recommend is placement on wearables. Why? Well, where a logo appears can determine whether it’s displayed daily or destined for the trash.

Like so many things, location, location, location is crucial in determining the likelihood of a logo getting a high degree of exposure.

Fact: Apparel/Wearables and bags account for more than 38% of all promotional product sales.

So, WHERE do you want to say it??

  • T-shirts, Caps, Or an Umbrella?
  • Coolers, Backpacks, Leather bags
  • Technology accessories – like laptop sleeves or tablet cover